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Healthcare in Slovakia

Slovakia

Healthcare in Slovakia

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Healthcare in Slovakia

Private Healthcare

No matter what country you decide to relocate to, getting private healthcare is always a safe option. The quality of national healthcare fluctuates from country to country. The price of the most fundamental care is often very high and this is supposing you find a suitable hospital or doctor to begin with.

Private healthcare, on the other hand, often adheres to a standardisation of service. Consequently, as an expat, it is probably wise to invest in private healthcare at least until you are completely familiar with the national health system. Getting medical treatment for you and your family without comprehensive health insurance could prove arduous, and no-one wants the hassle of bureaucracy in an emergency. You may even find that the country you are emigrating to has no national health service.

The benefits of private healthcare include:

  • Peace of mind

  • Better efficiency and quality of service

  • Could save large sums money (possibly thousands of pounds) in the case of an emergency

  • A vaster choice of services and practitioners

  • No waiting lists or bureaucracy

  • Ensures you do not have to settle for local, possibly inadequate or unhygienic, services

  • Request an English-speaking doctor / nurse

Necessity, not luxury

In recent years, private health insurance enquiries have soared in popularity amongst emigrants. By way of policy comparison, people and businesses are continually looking to reduce the cost of their private healthcare. For many, this is because private health cover is not considered an extravagance, but a requisite for living overseas.

However, it must be acknowledged that the rules and regulations associated with international private healthcare are often complex, and attempts to find realistic costs and cover can be both timely and tedious. Therefore, it is vital to approach private health insurance with a few certainties in mind:

Who can provide it and what you should expect

Many private health insurers now provide cover for most countries, so your options are vast. However, if you are emigrating to a country without nationalised healthcare, there are many factors to consider when choosing an insurance company and policy many of which differ by location and cost.

Will the insurer cover:

  • Maternity?

  • A chronic illness / condition?

  • A country at war?

You will have to weigh-up the costs of such services as private doctors, outpatient medicine, and dental cover. But that's not all. You may also have to decide where you'd like to receive treatment in the case of a serious health problem or injury. Does your adopted nation meet requirements, or would you prefer to return to the UK for treatment?

Your chosen destination

All though a policy may meet your medical requirements, a country's health service may not. Therefore, wherever your business takes you, it is important to consider:

  • Laws and regulations of the country

  • Accessibility and availability of treatment

  • 24-hour emergency treatment

  • Security

  • Case management and service delivery

Choosing your health insurance policy

When deciding upon a suitable private health plan, will you require any of the following benefits? If so, will you be able to receive them?

Cover for:

  • The region / country of relocation

  • Psychiatric care

  • Rehabilitation

  • Therapy

  • Emergency evacuation and transportation

  • In-patient and day case management

  • Out-patient treatment

  • Chronic and existing illnesses and conditions

  • Maternity

  • Dental / optical requirements and treatment

  • Out-of-area treatment

You will find that many policies include a small standard excess, which will be charged either per year, or per claim. However, if you choose a higher excess plan these premiums can be remarkably reduced.

Do I have any other choices?

Depending on where you decide to relocate, there are other health care options available to you:

European Health Insurance Card (EHIC)

Providing you are within the European Economic Area, UK citizens are eligible for emergency treatment with a EHIC. It entitles you to exactly the same standard of healthcare as a national. However, the card does not cover the cost of repatriation should you need to be flown back to the UK.

In some instances, the EHIC will cover you for pre-existing conditions, and it is often possible to prearrange treatments. Do remember, however, that an EHIC will not cover treatment at a private clinic or centre: always ask where you are being referred to for any treatment.

Treatment in the UK

It is a general truism that emigration is fraught with significant costs. As a result, people often consider private health insurance one cost too many especially if they are on a tight budget. They are all too willing to run the risk.

Consequently, many emigrants and travellers opt to return to the UK for medical treatment, but often overlook the fact that this too can be a very risky option. Firstly, you still need to be registered with a UK doctor to be eligible for treatment upon your return. If unprepared, you could find yourself in the same situation back in the UK.

Secondly, you need to account for medical emergencies which would require immediate attention. Is it really worth the risk?

National Healthcare

Slovakia provides good quality health care. Every village has a health centre and there is at least one hospital in every city and several health centres. Highly specialized hospitals are situated e.g. in Bratislava, Martin, Banska Bystrica and Koice. Emergency operates in every hospital open from afternoon till morning and at weekends 24 hours. Emergency medical service is operational 24 hours 7 days a week.

Emergency phone numbers: 155 and 112

Health care in Slovakia is financed by health insurance. Health insurance in Slovakia is obligatory and shall be paid by every citizen of Slovakia. The insurance fee is deducted from the wages. Medical insurance for children, the disabled and women on maternity leave is paid by the state. Some medical treatments such as plastic surgery or sterilization are paid by patients themselves. Medical treatments for administrative purposes are also paid by the patients. Price lists can be found in every health centre.

Dental treatment in Slovakia is usually not fully covered by health insurance and many dentists in Slovakia do not have contracts with health insurance companies. In this case, patient covers the full treatment himself. Operations and hospital treatments in Slovakia are also covered from the health insurance. Most medications are partially covered by the insurance; some medications are even fully covered while others are only available full payment. Antibiotics and many other pills are only available on doctoral prescription.

European Union citizens must have valid European Health Insurance Card. Medical treatments for other foreigners are available for direct payment. Opening hours for health centres are usually from 7.30 am till 3 pm, but can vary. There are these types of first contact doctors in Slovakia: general doctors for children or paediatricians, general doctors for adults, gynaecologists, dentists and specialists.

Medications are sold in pharmacies. There is a pharmacy in almost every village and several pharmacies in every town or city in Slovakia. The pharmacies in Slovakia have good stock of medications and drugs. Pharmacies are usually open from 7.30 am till 4 pm. There is a pharmacy on duty in every city. The name and address of the pharmacy on duty can be found on the door of every pharmacy.

Big hospitals in Slovakia

Bratislava Hospitals
Faculty Hospital Bratislava:Kramre - L. Drera 5 Limbova street 02/ 59541 111 Ruinov - 6 Ruinovsk Street, 02/4823411Star mesto - 13 Mickiewiczova street, 02/ 57290 111 Petralka - Sv. Cyrila a Metoda, 11 Antolsk street, 02/ 68671 111
Children's Faculty Hospital, Kramre, 1 Limbov street, tel. 02/59371111 National Oncological Institute - 1 Klenov street, 02/59378 111 The National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, 1 Pod krsnou hrkou, Kramre, tel. 02 59320111Military Hospital: 1 Cesta na Cerven most, tel. 02/59351216
Bansk Bystrica Hospitals
Roosevelt Hospital, 048/4726511, Bansk Bystrica
Ko?ice Hospitals
Faculty Hospital L. Pasteura, 43 Rastislavova street, 055/6153111, 1 trieda SNP, 055/6402111
Martin Hospitals
Martin Faculty Hospital, Kollrova 2, Martin, 043/4203303

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