NewsCase StudiesEvents

Using personal mobile devices in the workplace

Also in the news...

UK-Singapore trade agreement documents

Decisions and other documents from the UK-Singapore trade agreement.

Guidance The UK Sanctions List

Find out which people, entities and ships are designated or specified under regulations made under the Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act 2018, and why.

Foreign travel advice Saudi Arabia

Warnings and insurance Still current at: 15 April 2024 Updated: 14 April 2024 Latest update: 13 April 2024 – drones and missiles fired from Iran into Israel (‘Warnings and Insurance’ page)

Foreign travel advice Kuwait

Warnings and insurance Still current at: 15 April 2024 Updated: 14 April 2024 Latest update: 13 April 2024 – drones and missiles fired from Iran into Israel (‘Warnings and Insurance’ page)

Foreign travel advice Tunisia

Summary Still current at: 15 April 2024 Updated: 14 April 2024 Latest update: 13 April 2024 – drones and missiles fired from Iran into Israel (‘Warnings and Insurance’ page)

Using personal mobile devices in the workplace

Back to News

A recent survey showed that 60% of the UK population now own a smart phone and 20% own a tablet and an increasing number want to use their personal devices at work. Known as ‘bring your own device’, studies indicate that the benefits to business of allowing BYOD include increased efficiency, flexibility and employee morale, but the practice also carries a number of risks which employers must consider when allowing employees’ devices to be used to process work-related data.

We recommend that clients should have a clear ‘personal device at work’ policy for their staff.

F&L’s Kiki Stannard explained “The perceived benefits must be balanced against the potential risks to both employee and employer. For example, allowing employees to use their own mobile telephone for business purposes and then reimbursing them can cause tax reporting difficulties anyway, let alone the level of effort which may be required to ensure that the processing of personal data with BYOD remains compliant with all 8 Principles of the Data Protection Act. Remember, it is the employer who is held liable for any breaches under the DPA.”

F&L

You are not logged in!

Please login or register to ask our experts a question.

Login now or register.