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Import bonsai from Japan and Korea to Great Britain

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Import bonsai from Japan and Korea to Great Britain

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Find out how to import species of bonsai to Great Britain from Japan and Korea, who you can import from, quarantine rules and how to apply for a licence.

You can import certain species of bonsai from Japan and Korea to Great Britain.

From Japan, you can import naturally or artificially dwarfed plants of:

  • Chamaecyparis sp. Spach
  • Juniperus sp. L.
  • Pinus parviflora Sieb. and Zucc. (Pinus pentaphylla Mayr)
  • Pinus thunbergii Parl.
  • Pinus parviflora Sieb. and Zucc. grafted on a rootstock of another Pinus species, originating in Japan
  • Pinus thunbergii Parl. grafted on a rootstock of another Pinus species, originating in Japan

From Korea, you can import naturally or artificially dwarfed plants of:

  • Chamaecyparis sp. Spach
  • Juniperus sp. L.
  • Pinus parviflora Sieb. and Zucc. (Pinus pentaphylla Mayr)
  • Pinus parviflora Sieb. and Zucc. grafted on a rootstock of another Pinus species

Import bonsai from Japan

To import bonsai from Japan, you must:

  • apply to the Animal and Plant Health Agency ( APHA) for a licence
  • get your quarantine facilities approved - an inspector from the Plant Health and Seeds Inspectorate ( PHSI) will check your quarantine facilities

When the PHSI approves your facility they’ll send you a licence by email.

Import fees from Japan

The physical inspection will cost £32.15 plus:

  • £1.57 for the identification check
  • £5.25 for a documentary check for each phytosanitary certificate

Your licence will cost £42.50.

Inspections to approve your facility or plants during post-entry quarantine will cost £92.67 per 15 minutes with a minimum fee of £185.34.

Import bonsai from Korea

To import bonsai from Korea you must get your quarantine facilities approved.

When the PHSI approves the facility they’ll send you an email to confirm this.

Import fees from Korea

The physical inspection will cost £32.15 plus:

  • £1.57 for the identification check
  • £5.25 for a documentary check for each phytosanitary certificate

Post-entry inspections are currently free of charge.

When you can import bonsai

You can import:

  • Juniperus between 1 November to 31 March
  • Chamaecyparis and Pinus at any time of year

Import bonsai from registered nurseries

You must import bonsai plants and any growing media (for example, the soil and compost used to support the plant) from nurseries registered with the National Plant Protection Organisation ( NPPO) of Japan or Korea.

The NPPO:

  • checks that registered nurseries comply with UK import rules
  • issues a phytosanitary certificate to accompany exports of bonsai plants and any growing media

Quarantine bonsai imports

You must keep bonsai in quarantine at an approved containment facility on your premises when they arrive in Great Britain.

Your quarantine facilities must be approved before you can import bonsai from Japan or Korea.

Juniperus plants must be quarantined between 1 April to 30 June. Pinus and Chamaecyparis plants must be quarantined for at least 3 months of active growth.

You must:

  • move bonsai from Korea directly from the border control post ( BCP) to your approved quarantine facility
  • keep the bonsai in a containment facility such as a glasshouse or fully enclosed poly-tunnel
  • keep bonsai separate from other plants
  • keep bonsai free from pests and prevent pests escaping

Checking your plants for pests

An PHS Iinspector will make an appointment to inspect your plants:

  • when they arrive at your facilities
  • at least once during active growth
  • before allowing them to be released from quarantine

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