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Five Ways to Beat Imposter Syndrome at Work

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Five Ways to Beat Imposter Syndrome at Work

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The overwhelming feeling of crippling self-doubt and dread known as Imposter Syndrome has impacted a whopping 62% of people at work, according to a report by Access Commercial Finance. The survey of over 3000 adults in the UK shows over two-thirds of women (66%) have suffered from imposter syndrome compared to over half of men (56%) within the last 12 months. This raises a significant question: are women more likely to experience feeling inadequate in the workplace?

In light of the study, Lucinda Pullinger, Global Head of HR at Instant Offices delves into why many women experience this adverse phenomenon, which UK industries have the highest ratio of self-doubters and how business owners can beat imposter syndrome at work.

Over the last 20 years, the number of women-owned firms has increased, yet despite the growing number of female entrepreneurs and major global progress towards gender equality in the workplace, more and more successful women are speaking out about the burden of imposter syndrome.

Despite evidence of success, women experiencing this paralysing self-doubt are more likely to believe they are intellectual frauds. This level of stress Ė waiting to be found out by peers Ė can lead to anxiety, burnout and increased unhappiness among everyone from entrepreneurs to employees moving up the ladder.

As research suggests, men suffer 10% less than women, and when considering why women sometimes experience imposter syndrome at a higher rate than men, factors like workplace inequality and the pay gap may come into play.

Statistics from YouGov reveal that, when asked whether they have had the opportunity to lead on a project at work, only 44% of women said yes, compared to 59% of men. Women are also less likely to have experienced a pay rise or a bonus not connected to promotion, at only 40% compared to 53% of men. In addition, women say they are also more likely to be asked about their personal lives compared to men.

What Causes Imposter Syndrome at Work?

Imposter syndrome can severely impact career progression and cause negativity at work. When surveyed on the reasons for experiencing crippling self-doubt in the workplace, these were the top four causes:

  • 38% - Self-generated self-doubt
  • 23% - Being criticised
  • 20% - Having to ask for help
  • 16% - Self-comparisons to high achieving colleagues

Itís not just employees who are impacted, a study by AXA PPP Healthcare shows one in five small business owners admitted to suffering from imposter syndrome and being convinced someone else could do a better job of running their business.

UK Industries with the Highest Percentage of Self-Doubters

Imposter syndrome is more prolific in some industries compared to others. The same study of over 3000 UK adults revealed industries in which employees have experienced intense feelings of self-doubt in the last 12 months.

Highest

  • 87% - Creative arts and design
  • 79% - Environment and agriculture
  • 79% - Information research and analysis
  • 74% - Law
  • 73% - Media and internet

Lowest

  • 45% - Leisure, sport and tourism
  • 54% - Property and construction
  • 55% - Engineering & manufacturing
  • 55% - Insurance
  • 57% - Retail

Turning Imposter Syndrome Around

Even though so many people have experienced imposter syndrome, the good news is that itís not a permanent condition but rather a reaction to a set of circumstances, unrealistic self-expectation and stress. Some of the most popular suggestions on ways to turn it around include the following:

Accept Praise And Know Your Worth

Donít shy away from praise and compliments. Accept your achievements and if need be, write them down. When you try to talk yourself out of feeling confident in your role, all the proof is on paper. Knowing your worth means allowing your work to speak for itself and letting others see it too.

Stop Thinking Like an Imposter

Learn to recognise self-defeating thought patterns and replace them with more positive affirmations. The only way to stop feeling like an imposter is to stop thinking of yourself as one.

Donít Seek Perfection

Stop believing that if you donít excel at every facet of your job that youíre a failure at all of it. Facing challenges and losses is a key part of growth, so recognise that you donít have to be good at everything.

Know You Are Not Alone

Imposter syndrome tends to be the domain of overachievers, while underachievers tend to internalise less when faced with failure. If youíre constantly worried about not being good enough, chances are youíre in good company Ė most successful people constantly over analyse themselves!

Speaking from experience, Jodie Harris, Head of Content & Digital PR at MediaVision commented,

ďThe feeling of thinking someone is going to come in and call you out on your experience, your achievements and put you in a league much lower than you are currently working at is very real. Imposter Syndrome can happen at any time in your career.

ďFrom being an intern to being in the boardroom, questioning your place at the table can be disruptive to your progress and your confidence. One piece of advice I always tell my teams and myself is that your career did not come by chance, and where you are now and where you aim to be is justified. Know your worth and have conviction with your career goals. Success isnít a lottery ticket, itís earnt.Ē


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