NewsCase StudiesEvents

Doing Business In South Korea

Also in the news...

Import firewood into England, Scotland or Wales

Find out how to import firewood, such as logs and kindling, into England, Scotland and Wales (Great Britain).

How to check if you can delay customs payments and declarations

If you’re a business that currently buys goods from or sells goods to countries outside the UK, or are planning to trade with Europe from January 2021, HMRC’s new tool can help you identify ways you might be able to make the customs process easier for cheaper for your business. This short video shows you how to use the tool.

How can a customs intermediary or agent help me?

If you’re a UK business thinking about moving goods into or out of the UK , this video is here to help you understand how customs intermediaries or agents can help you. For more information have a look at the guidance available on gov.uk.

What are commodity codes?

If you're buying or selling goods abroad, you need to work out the amount of duty or VAT you owe. This short video tells you how to find out the ‘commodity code’ classification for your goods, using our Trade Tariff tool. Find out more on GOV.UK

What are controlled goods?

You’ll need a licence to import or export certain types of controlled goods. You may also need to pay extra duty in the UK. Unsure if this applies to your goods? This short video explains more about the types of goods that are classed as controlled. Find out more on GOV.UK

Doing Business In South Korea

Back to News

Nestled between two great powers, Japan and China, South Korea remains off the radar to most UK companies even though it is home to 50 million people generating GNP of US $1 trillion, making it the world’s 12th largest economy – just less than the size of the entire Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and equal to 2% of global GDP.

Sophisticated, affluent, globally aware consumers are eager to experience the latest fashions and products from around the world. Particularly, many South Koreans in their 20s and 30s have travelled internationally and have substantial disposable income. South Koreans are disciplined, hard-working, loyal, motivated, well-educated and eager to excel. Participating in this resilient and vibrant economy is about to become easier with the implementation of the EU-South Korea Free Trade Agreement.

Over the next five years, the South Korean economy is set to make the 10th-largest contribution to world growth. That’s as much as the UK and more than France or Italy. Despite the global economic slowdown, South Korea’s economy grew by 2.8% in 2013, and is predicted by the Bank of Koreato grow 3.8% in 2014.

Doing business in South Korea guide

You are not logged in!

Please login or register to ask our experts a question.

Login now or register.