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Australia Makes Necessary Cut-Backs

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Australia Makes Necessary Cut-Backs

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Australia is to cut back on jobs for migrant workers in an attempt to battle unemployment during the economic crisis.

GEMMA ALDRIDGE

Australia is to cut back on jobs for migrant workers in an attempt to battle unemployment during the economic crisis.

The Immigration Minister, Chris Evans has revealed the Australian governments plans to remove certain trades, including building and manufacturing, from the Critical Skills List (CSL), which dictates which industry sectors are open to migrant employment.

The CSL is a list of occupations which are currently given priority treatment by the Department of Immigration and Citizenship in order to accelerate the intake of skilled migrant workers. While removing certain occupations from the list will not stop migrant workers from gaining employment in Australia, the cutbacks will stem the flow of the incoming workforce.

The decision to minimise job opportunities for migrant workers comes after an increase in unemployment levels - particularly visible in the construction industry as a result of the global economic downturn.

It will still be possible for non-CSL applicants to go through the fast-track application process, but the visa must then be sponsored by the State or an employer.

The withdrawal of priority processing for CSL visa applications is not necessarily an indicator that the Australian government no longer wishes to employ migrant workers. It is clear, however, that the recession has had a marked impact on the economy, and that there is a need to take stock, and prioritise unemployment among the Australian population. 

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