NewsCase StudiesEvents

Cultural Training in Mexico

Mexico

Cultural Training in Mexico

Mexico Business Experts

Recent forum posts

 

  1. Starting a Restaurant In South Korea

    Hi:I'm interested in starting a small business in Seoul, South Korea that would sell one signature food item ~ one that the South Koreans will go crazy for. I'm interested in getting information regarding start up costs, how to obtain a business license, as I am an American citizen, how to rent a small restaurant space and whether or not it would be more beneficial to go in with a Korean busi

    Total Posts: 3 Last post by dianaeddie

  2. Starting a new Trading Business in Africa

    Dear Sir / Ma'amI am looking to start a new trading business .Like most start ups my I have low caputal, however I am looking for opportunities with African countries that are high growth and start business relation and trading set up fo with these countries. Could you advise the way I can go about doing this and which countries and persons I could target / approach. Thanks!

    Total Posts: 2 Last post by innompila

Cultural Training in Mexico

Doing business in a foreign country isn't like going on holiday: don't expect to get by with knowledge of a few words, and don't assume business is conducted in the same way universally.

But how can you properly prepare? There are many cultural training companies and schools which can help you. They offer cross-cultural grounding, bridging the translatory and protocolic gaps between nations and people.

Providing guidance in all areas of business and sociality, these cultural training companies are experts when it comes to negotiation training; management training; and diversity training. All training, of course, can be country-specific.

Tutorials can take many forms, so investigate which will be right for you and, if necessary, your employees.

Business Etiquette in Mexico

The formalities and informalities; the how dyou dos and how dyou donts. Etiquette is one of the foundations of modern civilisation, and business is no exception. A business blunder, in some countries, could mean the difference between a deal and disrepute. Again, its all about culture if not adopting, at least recognising and respecting the traditions and protocols of a people.

First rule for marketing in Mexico: the right connections facilitate business success. Second rule: first impressions matter. Third rule: face-to-face meetings are preferred over telephone, letters or email.

In business meeting usually the initial meeting is with someone of high stature, hence it is important your delegation include an upper-level executive. After the initial getting-to-know-you meeting, the senior executive may not attend meetings anymore. Its not a bad sign: it means you are now getting down to business. Expect to answer questions about your personal background, family and life interests.

It is important that you arrive on time for meetings, although your Mexican business associates may be up to 30 minutes late. Do not appear irritated if this occurs as people often run behind schedule.

It will take several meetings to come to an agreement. Negotiations and decisions may take a long time in Mexico. You must be patient. Deadlines are seen as flexible and fluid, and negotiations will include a lot of haggling. Do not give your best offer first and do not include an attorney on your negotiating team.

Have all written material available in both English and Spanish. If you do not speak Spanish, hire an interpreter.

British business dress code applies.

Click here to Ask an Expert about Cultural Training in Mexico

You are not logged in!

Please login or register to ask our experts a question.

Login now or register.