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Healthcare Update: Your Private Insurance Options Explained

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Healthcare Update: Your Private Insurance Options Explained

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People and businesses are continually looking to reduce the cost of their private healthcare. For many, this is because private health cover is not considered an extravagance, but a requisite for living overseas.

<meta content="OpenOffice.org 3.0 (Win32)" name="GENERATOR"/> <style type="text/css"> <!-- @page { margin: 2cm } P { margin-bottom: 0.21cm } A:link { so-language: zxx } --> </style> <p>In recent years, private health insurance enquiries have soared in popularity amongst emigrants. By way of policy comparison, people and businesses are continually looking to reduce the cost of their private healthcare. For many, this is because private health cover is not considered an extravagance, but a requisite for living overseas.</p> <p>However, it must be acknowledged that the rules and regulations associated with international private healthcare are often complex, and attempts to find realistic costs and cover can be both timely and tedious. Therefore, it is vital to approach private health insurance with a few certainties in mind:<em/></p> <h2>Who can provide it and what you should expect</h2> <p>Many private health insurers now provide cover for most countries, so your options are vast. However, if you are emigrating to a country without nationalised healthcare, there are many factors to consider when choosing an insurance company and policy – many of which differ by location and cost.</p> <p>Will the insurer cover:</p> <ul> <li>Maternity?</li> <li>A chronic illness / condition?</li> <li>A country at war?</li> </ul> <p>You will have to weigh-up the costs of such services as private doctors, outpatient medicine, and dental cover. But that's not all. You may also have to decide where you'd like to receive treatment in the case of a serious health problem or injury. Does your adopted nation have the necessary equipment, standards, and skill, or would you prefer to return to the UK for treatment?<em/></p> <h2>Your chosen destination</h2> <p style="font-style: normal;">All though a policy may meet your medical requirements, a country's health service may not. Wherever your business takes you, therefore, it is important to consider:</p> <ul> <li><span style="font-style: normal;">Laws and regulations of the country</span></li> <li><span style="font-style: normal;">Accessibility and availability of treatment </span> </li> <li><span style="font-style: normal;">24-hour emergency treatment</span></li> <li><span style="font-style: normal;">Security</span></li> <li><span style="font-style: normal;">Case management and service delivery</span></li> </ul> <h2>Choosing your health insurance policy</h2> <p style="font-style: normal;">When deciding upon a suitable private health plan, will you require any of the following benefits? If so, will you be able to receive them? Cover for:</p> <ul> <li><span style="font-style: normal;">The region / country of relocation</span></li> <li><span style="font-style: normal;">Psychiatric care</span></li> <li><span style="font-style: normal;">Rehabilitation</span></li> <li><span style="font-style: normal;">Therapy</span></li> <li><span style="font-style: normal;">Emergency evacuation and transportation</span></li> <li><span style="font-style: normal;">In-patient and day case management</span></li> <li><span style="font-style: normal;">Out-patient treatment</span></li> <li><span style="font-style: normal;">Chronic and existing illnesses and conditions</span></li> <li><span style="font-style: normal;">Maternity</span></li> <li><span style="font-style: normal;">Dental / optical requirements and treatment</span></li> <li><span style="font-style: normal;">Out-of-area treatment</span></li> </ul> <p>You will find that many policies include a small standard excess, which will be charged either per year, or per claim. However, if you choose a higher excess plan these premiums can be remarkably reduced.</p> <h2>Do I have any other choices?</h2> <p>Depending on where you decide to relocate, there are other health care options available to you:</p> <p><strong>European Health Insurance Card (EHIC)</strong></p> <p>Providing you are within the European Economic Area, UK citizens are eligible for emergency treatment with a EHIC. It entitles you to exactly the same standard of healthcare as a national. However, the card does not cover the cost of repatriation should you need to be flown back to the UK.</p> <p style="font-style: normal;">In some instances, the EHIC will cover you for pre-existing conditions, and it is often possible to prearrange treatments. Do remember, however, that an EHIC will not cover treatment at a private clinic or centre: always ask where you are being referred to for any treatment.</p> <p style="font-style: normal;"><strong>Treatment in the UK</strong></p> <p style="font-style: normal;">It is a general truism that emigration is fraught with significant costs. As a result, people often consider private health insurance one cost too many, especially if they are on a tight budget. They are all too willing to “run the risk.”</p> <p style="font-style: normal;">Consequently, many emigrants and travellers opt to return to the UK for medical treatment, but often overlook the fact that this too can be a very risky option. Firstly, you still need to be registered with a UK doctor to be eligible for treatment upon your return. If unprepared, you could find yourself in the same situation back in the UK. </p> <p style="font-style: normal;">Secondly, you need to account for medical emergencies which would require immediate attention. Is it really worth the risk?</p> <meta http-equiv="CONTENT-TYPE" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/> <title> <meta content=&quot;OpenOffice.org 3.0 (Win32)&quot; name=&quot;GENERATOR&quot;/> <style type=&quot;text/css&quot;> <!-- @page { margin: 2cm } P { margin-bottom: 0.21cm } A:link { so-language: zxx } --> </style> <p>In recent years, private health insurance enquiries have soared inpopularity amongst emigrants. By way of policy comparison, people andbusinesses are continually looking to reduce the cost of theirprivate healthcare. For many, this is because private health cover isnot considered an extravagance, but a requisite for living overseas.</p> <p>However, it must be acknowledged that the rules and regulationsassociated with international private healthcare are often complex,and attempts to find realistic costs and cover can be both timely and tedious. Therefore, it is vital to approach private health insurancewith a few certainties in mind:</p> <p><br/> </p> <p><i>Who can provide it and what you should expect</i></p> <p>Many private health insurers now provide cover for most countries,so your options are vast. However, if you are emigrating to a countrywithout nationalised healthcare, there are many factors to considerwhen choosing an insurance company and policy – many of whichdiffer by location and cost.</p> <p>Will the insurer cover:</p> <ul> <li>Maternity?</li> <li>A chronic illness / condition?</li> <li>A country at war?</li> </ul> <p>You will have to weigh-up the costs of such services as privatedoctors, outpatient medicine, and dental cover. But that's not all.You may also have to decide where you'd like to receive treatment inthe case of a serious health problem or injury. Does your adoptednation have the necessary equipment, standards, and skill, or wouldyou prefer to return to the UK for treatment?<br/> </p> <h2>Your chosen destination</h2> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>All though a policy may meet yourmedical requirements, a country's health service may not. Whereveryour business takes you, therefore, it is important to consider:<br/> </p> <ul> <li><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Laws and regulations of the country</span></li> <li><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Accessibility and availability of treatment </span> </li> <li><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>24-hour emergency treatment</span></li> <li><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Security</span></li> <li><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Case management and service delivery</span><br/></li> </ul> <h2>Choosing your health insurance policy</h2> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>When deciding upon a suitable privatehealth plan, will you require any of the following benefits? If so,will you be able to receive them? Cover for:</p> <ul> <li><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>The region / country of relocation</span></li> <li><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Psychiatric care</span></li> <li><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Rehabilitation</span></li> <li><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Therapy</span></li> <li><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Emergency evacuation and transportation</span></li> <li><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>In-patient and day case management</span></li> <li><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Out-patient treatment</span></li> <li><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Chronic and existing illnesses and conditions</span></li> <li><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Maternity</span></li> <li><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Dental / optical requirements and treatment</span></li> <li><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Out-of-area treatment</span><br/></li> </ul> <p>You will find that many policies include a small standard excess,which will be charged either per year, or per claim. However, if youchoose a higher excess plan these premiums can be remarkably reduced.<br/><i/></p> <h2>Do I have any other choices?</h2> <p align=&quot;left&quot; style=&quot;margin-bottom: 0cm;&quot;>Depending on where youdecide to relocate, there are other health care options available toyou:</p> <p><b>European Health Insurance Card (EHIC)</b></p> <p>Providing you are within the European Economic Area, UK citizensare eligible for emergency treatment with a EHIC. It entitles you toexactly the same standard of healthcare as a national. However, thecard does not cover the cost of repatriation should you need to beflown back to the UK.</p> <p>In some instances, the EHIC will cover you for pre-existingconditions, and it is often possible to prearrange treatments. Doremember, however, that an EHIC will not cover treatment at a privateclinic or centre: always ask where you are being referred to for anytreatment.</p> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;><b>Treatment in the UK</b></p> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>It is a general truism that emigrationis fraught with significant costs. As a result, people often considerprivate health insurance one cost too many, especially if they are ona tight budget. They are all too willing to “run the risk.”</p> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Consequently, many emigrants andtravellers opt to return to the UK for medical treatment, but oftenoverlook the fact that this too can be a very risky option. Firstly,you still need to be registered with a UK doctor to be eligible fortreatment upon your return. If unprepared, you could find yourselfin the same situation back in the UK. </p> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Secondly, you need to account formedical emergencies which would require immediate attention. Is itreally worth the risk?</p> <meta http-equiv=&quot;CONTENT-TYPE&quot; content=&quot;text/html; charset=utf-8&quot;/> <title> <meta content=&quot;OpenOffice.org 3.0 (Win32)&quot; name=&quot;GENERATOR&quot;/> <style type=&quot;text/css&quot;> <!-- @page { margin: 2cm } P { margin-bottom: 0.21cm } A:link { so-language: zxx } --> </style> <p>In recent years, private health insurance enquiries have soared inpopularity amongst emigrants. By way of policy comparison, people andbusinesses are continually looking to reduce the cost of theirprivate healthcare. For many, this is because private health cover isnot considered an extravagance, but a requisite for living overseas.</p> <p>However, it must be acknowledged that the rules and regulationsassociated with international private healthcare are often complex,and attempts to find realistic costs and cover can be both timely and tedious. Therefore, it is vital to approach private health insurancewith a few certainties in mind:<br/><br/> </p> <h2>Who can provide it and what you should expect</h2> <p>Many private health insurers now provide cover for most countries,so your options are vast. However, if you are emigrating to a countrywithout nationalised healthcare, there are many factors to considerwhen choosing an insurance company and policy – many of whichdiffer by location and cost.</p> <p>Will the insurer cover:<br/><br/> </p> <ul> <li> <p>Maternity?</p> </li> <li> <p>A chronic illness / condition?</p> </li> <li> <p>A country at war?</p> <p> </p> </li> </ul> <p>You will have to weigh-up the costs of such services as privatedoctors, outpatient medicine, and dental cover. But that's not all.You may also have to decide where you'd like to receive treatment inthe case of a serious health problem or injury. Does your adoptednation have the necessary equipment, standards, and skill, or wouldyou prefer to return to the UK for treatment?<br/><br/> </p> <h2>Your chosen destination</h2> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>All though a policy may meet yourmedical requirements, a country's health service may not. Whereveryour business takes you, therefore, it is important to consider:<br/><br/> </p> <ul> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Laws and regulations of the country</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Accessibility and availability of treatment </span> </p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>24-hour emergency treatment</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Security</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Case management and service delivery</span><br/><br/> </p> </li> </ul> <h2>Choosing your health insurance policy</h2> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>When deciding upon a suitable privatehealth plan, will you require any of the following benefits? If so,will you be able to receive them? Cover for:<br/><br/> </p> <ul> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>The region / country of relocation</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Psychiatric care</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Rehabilitation</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Therapy</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Emergency evacuation and transportation</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>In-patient and day case management</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Out-patient treatment</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Chronic and existing illnesses and conditions</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Maternity</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Dental / optical requirements and treatment</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Out-of-area treatment</span><br/><br/> </p> </li> </ul> <p>You will find that many policies include a small standard excess,which will be charged either per year, or per claim. However, if youchoose a higher excess plan these premiums can be remarkably reduced.<br/><br/> </p> <h2>Do I have any other choices?</h2> <p>Depending on where youdecide to relocate, there are other health care options available toyou:<br/><br/> </p> <p><b>European Health Insurance Card (EHIC)</b></p> <p>Providing you are within the European Economic Area, UK citizensare eligible for emergency treatment with a EHIC. It entitles you toexactly the same standard of healthcare as a national. However, thecard does not cover the cost of repatriation should you need to beflown back to the UK.</p> <p>In some instances, the EHIC will cover you for pre-existingconditions, and it is often possible to prearrange treatments. Doremember, however, that an EHIC will not cover treatment at a privateclinic or centre: always ask where you are being referred to for anytreatment.<br/><br/> </p> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;><b>Treatment in the UK</b></p> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>It is a general truism that emigrationis fraught with significant costs. As a result, people often considerprivate health insurance one cost too many, especially if they are ona tight budget. They are all too willing to “run the risk.”</p> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Consequently, many emigrants andtravellers opt to return to the UK for medical treatment, but oftenoverlook the fact that this too can be a very risky option. Firstly,you still need to be registered with a UK doctor to be eligible fortreatment upon your return. If unprepared, you could find yourselfin the same situation back in the UK. </p> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Secondly, you need to account formedical emergencies which would require immediate attention. Is itreally worth the risk?</p> <meta http-equiv=&quot;CONTENT-TYPE&quot; content=&quot;text/html; charset=utf-8&quot;/> <title> <meta content=&quot;OpenOffice.org 3.0 (Win32)&quot; name=&quot;GENERATOR&quot;/> <style type=&quot;text/css&quot;> <!-- @page { margin: 2cm } P { margin-bottom: 0.21cm } --> </style> <p>In recent years, private health insurance enquiries have soared inpopularity amongst emigrants. By way of policy comparison, people andbusinesses are continually looking to reduce the cost of theirprivate healthcare. For many, this is because private health cover isnot considered an extravagance, but a requisite for living overseas.</p> <p>However, it must be acknowledged that the rules and regulationsassociated with international private healthcare are often complex,and attempts to find realistic costs and cover can be both timely and tedious. Therefore, it is vital to approach private health insurancewith a few certainties in mind:</p> <p> </p> <h2>Who can provide it and what you should expect</h2> <p>Many private health insurers now provide cover for most countries,so your options are vast. However, if you are emigrating to a countrywithout nationalised healthcare, there are many factors to considerwhen choosing an insurance company and policy – many of whichdiffer by location and cost.</p> <p>Will the insurer cover:<br/><br/> </p> <ul> <li> <p>Maternity?</p> </li> <li> <p>A chronic illness / condition?</p> </li> <li> <p>A country at war?</p> <p> </p> </li> </ul> <p>You will have to weigh-up the costs of such services as privatedoctors, outpatient medicine, and dental cover. But that's not all.You may also have to decide where you'd like to receive treatment inthe case of a serious health problem or injury. Does your adoptednation have the necessary equipment, standards, and skill, or wouldyou prefer to return to the UK for treatment?</p> <p><br/> </p> <h2>Your chosen destination</h2> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>All though a policy may meet yourmedical requirements, a country's health service may not. Whereveryour business takes you, therefore, it is important to consider:</p> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;><br/> </p> <ul> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Laws and regulations of the country</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Accessibility and availability of treatment </span> </p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>24-hour emergency treatment</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Security</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Case management and service delivery</span><br/><br/> </p> </li> </ul> <h2>Choosing your health insurance policy</h2> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>When deciding upon a suitable privatehealth plan, will you require any of the following benefits? If so,will you be able to receive them? Cover for:<br/><br/> </p> <ul> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>The region / country of relocation</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Psychiatric care</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Rehabilitation</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Therapy</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Emergency evacuation and transportation</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>In-patient and day case management</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Out-patient treatment</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Chronic and existing illnesses and conditions</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Maternity</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Dental / optical requirements and treatment</span></p> </li> <li> <p><span style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Out-of-area treatment</span></p> </li> </ul> <p><br/> </p> <p>You will find that many policies include a small standard excess,which will be charged either per year, or per claim. However, if youchoose a higher excess plan these premiums can be remarkably reduced.</p> <p><br/> </p> <h2>Do I have any other choices?</h2> <p align=&quot;left&quot; style=&quot;margin-bottom: 0cm;&quot;>Depending on where youdecide to relocate, there are other health care options available toyou:</p> <p> </p> <p><b>European Health Insurance Card (EHIC)</b></p> <p>Providing you are within the European Economic Area, UK citizensare eligible for emergency treatment with a EHIC. It entitles you toexactly the same standard of healthcare as a national. However, thecard does not cover the cost of repatriation should you need to beflown back to the UK.</p> <p>In some instances, the EHIC will cover you for pre-existingconditions, and it is often possible to prearrange treatments. Doremember, however, that an EHIC will not cover treatment at a privateclinic or centre: always ask where you are being referred to for anytreatment.<br/><br/> </p> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;><b>Treatment in the UK</b></p> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>It is a general truism that emigrationis fraught with significant costs. As a result, people often considerprivate health insurance one cost too many, especially if they are ona tight budget. They are all too willing to “run the risk.”</p> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Consequently, many emigrants andtravellers opt to return to the UK for medical treatment, but oftenoverlook the fact that this too can be a very risky option. Firstly,you still need to be registered with a UK doctor to be eligible fortreatment upon your return. If unprepared, you could find yourselfin the same situation back in the UK. </p> <p style=&quot;font-style: normal;&quot;>Secondly, you need to account formedical emergencies which would require immediate attention. Is itreally worth the risk?</p> <meta http-equiv=&quot;CONTENT-TYPE&quot; content=&quot;text/html; charset=utf-8&quot;/> <title>

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